Denver Startup Week 2018 Review

Want to write easy content for your blog? Take one subject and write 4 blog posts about that one subject. Want to squeeze one more blog out of that onion of an idea? Take that idea and those 4 blog posts and put them all into one post to make it easier for people to find all the posts related to that one idea.

In this case, that one idea is the 2018 Denver Startup Week which was my first startup week. It was fun and felt like a good use of my time. Want to know more about my 2018 Denver Startup Week experience? Check out the posts here:

Denver Startup Week 2018 Review (Day 4): Improv, Art, Startup Founders and Inspiration

Denver Startup Week is an aptly named week long convention about startups and technology in Denver, Colorado. Two of the coolest things about Denver Startup Week is that it’s free to attend and it takes place in different locations throughout downtown Denver. 2018 was the first year I was able to participate in Denver Startup Week. I have watched through social media in previous years but I was never able to go because I worked as a 911 dispatcher and never felt it was a good use of my limited vacation time since I wasn’t working in the tech or startup industry. But this year in working for a tech startup with unlimited vacation time and coworkers that are open to collaboration and new ideas so I was excited to see what I could bring back to my team from Denver Startup Week.

Colorado, and Denver specifically, is growing by leaps and bounds. One of the things that makes me proud about our tech and startup community is the inclusion that we practice and it was great to see that attitude explicitly called out during the opening keynote and supported by the actions of other participants and by the panel on Thursday. Because my fear is that we will move away from that attitude as we grow so it’s great to see that attitude reinforced during the biggest free startup conference in the world. (My Day 2 review can be found here)

Day 4

I started out Day 4 at 8am the Bovine Theater for an Improv Workshop for Developers and this sounds like the epitome of “ugh, really?” because it’s improv at 8am… for developers. It sounds like a cringy setup for a sitcom episode. But it was SO GREAT! It was hosted by 2 people whose names I forgot but the woman in charge makes her living by doing improv poetry which instantly made her one of my heroes because anyone who can make a living by doing something that is creative and fulfilling to them is a hero of mine.

My favorite takeaway from this session is the importance of respecting the existence of imaginary objects both in improv and in writing code. An improv scene falls apart when one person pretends there’s a table in the middle of the stage only to have another actor ignore the existence of that table. The same is true for code. If a developer defines an object and other developers do not use that object in ways that respect the original definition, the code is clunky and difficult to follow.

Now since this was my first Denver Startup Week, Monday was overwhelming and Tuesday and Wednesday were packed to the gills with panels so I decided to take it slow on Day 4. I took it so slow… (How slow?!) I took it so slow I only went to 2 panels. However I got to continue to wonder at all the positive changes to downtown Denver. I took some time to check out the trendy Milk Market for lunch which was very overwhelming and even stopped to check out an art gallery.

It is very important that inspiration is accepted from all sorts of places because inspiration is a funny thing and strikes at odd moments and affects you in unexpected ways. This is why many of the hardest programming problems are often solved while on a walk or in the shower or looking at art so I make a point to enjoy art both for just the pure enjoyment of it and for the inspiration it may provide. This installation was at the Robischon Gallery on Wazee Street in downtown Denver. The art has changed since Denver Startup Week but you should still check it out.

After taking my time and checking out a few sights I was allowed to hang out in the CTRL Collective co-working space before my last panel of Denver Startup Week which was about the stress of a startup. Since I now work at a startup, I thought this would be a great way to talk with other startup employees about the stresses of the industry. I was wrong. Instead it was a panel of startup founders talking about dealing with stress from the point of view of a founder which was still good to hear about. Since I have a bit of an entrepreneurial streak in me this was absolutely worth my time.

One of my favorite takeaways from this panel was from Finn Kelly when talking about imposter syndrome which is as prevalent among entrepreneurs as it is among software developers. Imposter Syndrome is when you feel like you don’t belong in the industry or position that you want to be in because you feel like everyone else must know more than you. You feel like someone is going to unmask you as an imposter. Kelly’s advise was that any time he feels that feeling he asks “Have I done something inauthentic to get here?” and if the answer is “No.” then he is not an impostor! It’s simple but I love it!

I also added a bunch of books to my “To-Read” list on GoodReads thanks to this panel. A lot of thinking about thinking goes into being a successful startup founder.

That was it for my 2018 Denver Startup Week. I bailed on Day 5 because my wife was off work that day and I’m mostly introverted so, after spending 4 days talking and listening to many people, I was ready to recharge. I hope I helped give some insight into a good Denver Startup Week experience and I look forward doing it again next year!




Denver Startup Week 2018 Review (Day 3): Meeting People Again, Not Asking Questions and Ibotta’s QA Strategy

Denver Startup Week is an aptly named week long convention about startups and technology in Denver, Colorado. Two of the coolest things about Denver Startup Week is that it’s free to attend and it takes place in different locations throughout downtown Denver. 2018 was the first year I was able to participate in Denver Startup Week. I have watched through social media in previous years but I was never able to go because I worked as a 911 dispatcher and never felt it was a good use of my limited vacation time since I wasn’t working in the tech or startup industry. But this year in working for a tech startup with unlimited vacation time and coworkers that are open to collaboration and new ideas so I was excited to see what I could bring back to my team from Denver Startup Week.

Colorado, and Denver specifically, is growing by leaps and bounds. One of the things that makes me proud about our tech and startup community is the inclusion that we practice and it was great to see that attitude explicitly called out during the opening keynote and supported by the actions of other participants and by the panel on Thursday. Because my fear is that we will move away from that attitude as we grow so it’s great to see that attitude reinforced during the biggest free startup conference in the world. (My Day 2 review can be found here)

Day 3

Day 3 started with another morning trip to the CapitalOne Cafe, but this time I was in the right place! I got to meet a bunch of great people who I have been following on Twitter who you can usually find running the Boulder Python Meetup as they talked about how to grow new developer communities with purpose. If you work with technology at all, you know that the hardest part about technology is people and even though developer communities (user groups, meetups, conferences, mailing lists, etc.) are centered around technology, it’s the people and how they treat each other that make the community. I want to spend more time learning about Python and contributing to the community just because the people involved are nice and smart, which is a pretty cool feeling! I also got to re-meet Jessica West and realized just how much I don’t expect people to remember me. I’m all for humility, but I think I take it too far there. I’m just gonna be excited to see people from now on and if they don’t remember me they’ll probably say something.

The next panel I went to was one of my few panels that were not in the developer track. It was a talk about startup culture and how to scale it. This is something I worry about at Infinicept because we have a great implicit culture and I want to keep it going as we keep adding people. So I was very excited to listen to Josh Ashton, Emma Bindbeutel and… the guy that moderated the talk and works at Go Spot Check but I forgot his name. I came away from the talk feeling good that we are safe keeping our culture implicit for a while longer however I’ll feel better as we keep growing to have our culture explicitly defined. I also came away from that talk with a lot of questions because it turns out that when I have a lot of questions but only the opportunity to ask one question my mind seizes up and I end up asking no questions. At least I wrote them down so I can ask them some other time.

My foray out of the developer track was short lived as the next panel I went to was about figuring out how to have quality code without having a QA team. The talk was by Kelly Shuster who leads the Android engineering team at Ibotta. Since my company also does not have a QA team I was very excited to hear how a successful company like Ibotta does this. The overall lesson of the talk was to have an open, honest process around development that is owned by everyone involved. One of the really cool things Ibotta uses is feature flags, a thing I hadn’t heard about before. I really like the idea of having a flag that can be used to turn a feature on and off! I also like that there’s a routine and a reason to the release process that is used and respected by everyone in the process. I need to take these ideas to my team because I think they’d help out a lot or at least get us talking about how we want to own the quality of our applications.

On the way to the next panel I struck up a conversation with a random woman on the 16th Street Mall Ride about software development, QA testing and the relationship between developers and testers. When I got to the panel about empowering diverse engineering teams for success, it was not what I expected. Jesse White from Bluprint was the lone presenter. He talked mostly about the challenges of going from developer to manager which was neat to listen to, but since I haven’t even reached my first full year of my software development career it was not really applicable to me. He made some good points and brought up good concerns and issues but those are things that I don’t need to worry about yet.




Denver Startup Week 2018 Review (Day 2): First Job Search, ReactJS, Hunters, Gatherers and Developer Keynote

Denver Startup Week is an aptly named week long convention about startups and technology in Denver, Colorado. Two of the coolest things about Denver Startup Week is that it’s free to attend and it takes place in different locations throughout downtown Denver. 2018 was the first year I was able to participate in Denver Startup Week. I have watched through social media in previous years but I was never able to go because I worked as a 911 dispatcher and never felt it was a good use of my limited vacation time since I wasn’t working in the tech or startup industry. But this year in working for a tech startup with unlimited vacation time and coworkers that are open to collaboration and new ideas so I was excited to see what I could bring back to my team from Denver Startup Week.

Colorado, and Denver specifically, is growing by leaps and bounds. One of the things that makes me proud about our tech and startup community is the inclusion that we practice and it was great to see that attitude explicitly called out during the opening keynote and supported by the actions of other participants and by the panel on Thursday. Because my fear is that we will move away from that attitude as we grow so it’s great to see that attitude reinforced during the biggest free startup conference in the world. (My Day 1 review can be found here)

Day 2

Day 2 started with at stop at the CapitalOne Cafe for a panel only for me to realize after getting some tasty coffee and danishes that I was at the wrong panel so when I finally got to the panel that I wanted to be at, it was packed the panelists didn’t have any microphones so it was difficult to hear them. On the plus side I did get to talk with one of my favorite people, Bryan Griess with FusionAuth, so that worked out!

It was neat being at an event that was good for networking without wanting to get a new job, but I went to a talk about getting your first junior developer job anyway and I realized that, despite the good intentions of such a talk, a talk about how others got our first development job is not that useful. I appreciate the intent and I’ll give advice to anyone who maybe asks for it but it just didn’t seem that useful. We all have our own paths and own strengths and weaknesses and as much as I hate hearing “It depends…” from any sort of panelist, the hardest part about getting into the tech industry is just getting your foot in the door and the only advice I’m willing to give unsolicited is to keep trying, be honest and listen to answers when you ask advice. I’m going to again divert myself from ranting about practicing.

As with getting your first tech job, most business advice is an opinion. There’s very few facts in business advice because there’s so much room to cover. However one of the comforting things about technology is that, like math, there are more facts than there are in business advice so I was happy there was a technical panel in the middle(ish) of the week. It was a talk about React Performance with Jeff Carbonella from Gusto. My company decided to go with React for one of our new apps and we’re looking to get all of our apps using React. Since I just recently watched most of a Pluralsight tutorial on React and I’ve modified a component that’s in production code I wanted to see what I could understand and learn and liked what I found out at the panel. It turns out all of your React performance problems can be solved by using pure components! Ok, I’m kidding but Jeff did show a bit of how cool pure components can be and I appreciate it.

After that I made my way to the swanky Slalom offices right between Union Station and Coors Field and I once again marvelled at the amount of fancy new buildings there are in the area. This time I went to learn about common tools from Matthew Boeckman and learned, quite unexpectedly, about the art of flint knapping which has nothing directly related to computer technology but still pretty damn cool and useful. Matt said that good tools should be accessible, ubiquitous, empowering and flexible and it doesn’t matter if we’re talking about tech tools today or stone tools a millenia ago which makes a bunch of sense. He also made a great point about the myth of separate responsibilities in pre-agricultural societies. There’s the myth that men were hunters and women were gatherers and that there was a split in these responsibilities that couldn’t be true because when you’re trying to survive you do what needs to be done regardless of your title. “If you’re a gatherer and you see a rabbit, you hunt. If you’re a hunter and you see berries, you gather.” This theory works just as well for pre-agricultural societies trying to survive and for modern tech startups! If you notice something that needs to be done there’s a good chance you’re the person who needs to make it happen. To bring this completely back into tech, one reference he mentioned is the Google Site Reliability Engineering which sounds like a resource more people should know about, especially since it’s free!

You’d think I’d be done after all this, but nope. There was still one more panel and it was the biggest panel of the day! The Developer Track Keynote was a panel of 4 smart people who are in charge of lots of smart people at their well respected companies. It was moderated by Kelly Shuster who is also a smart people in charge of other smart people at Ibotta. The theme of the panel was “Why Colorado?” and their answers mostly boiled down to our inclusive startup and tech culture and the Colorado lifestyle that shows that work is not our number one priority. It made me feel super proud to hear this because I’m proud of what we have in Colorado and it’s nice to see that being recognized from people. Micheal Lopp, the smart guy in charge of smart people at Slack said one of their mottos is “Work hard and go home” which I love! I also find it funny that, of all companies, this motto belongs to Slack because my company’s use of Slack makes it the most difficult for me to leave work when I leave work.

That’s it for Day 2, next week I’ll post my review about day 3!




Denver Startup Week 2018 Review (Day 1): Keynote, BaseCamp, Learning to Learn and UX

Denver Startup Week is an aptly named week long convention about startups and technology in Denver, Colorado. Two of the coolest things about Denver Startup Week is that it’s free to attend and it takes place in different locations throughout downtown Denver. 2018 was the first year I was able to participate in Denver Startup Week. I have watched through social media in previous years but I was never able to go because I worked as a 911 dispatcher and never felt it was a good use of my limited vacation time since I wasn’t working in the tech or startup industry. But this year in working for a tech startup with unlimited vacation time and coworkers that are open to collaboration and new ideas so I was excited to see what I could bring back to my team from Denver Startup Week.

Colorado, and Denver specifically, is growing by leaps and bounds. One of the things that makes me proud about our tech and startup community is the inclusion that we practice and it was great to see that attitude explicitly called out during the opening keynote and supported by the actions of other participants and by the panel on Thursday. Because my fear is that we will move away from that attitude as we grow so it’s great to see that attitude reinforced during the biggest free startup conference in the world.

Day 1

Day 1 was quickly overwhelming. It started out with a special kick-off breakfast which, I learned after I got there, required a special registration that I didn’t do. It was the worst thing to happen to me all week. I’m not being over dramatic about it though. The rest of the week was so good that the worst thing to happen to me was missing out on some breakfast on Day 1. I’ll take a week like that any day…er… week.

The key-note involved some laser lights (Is that saying the same thing twice), a super enthusiastic and well liked member of the Colorado tech community, Erik Mitisek who is the Chief Innovation Officer for the State of Colorado, a proud and inspiring Pattie Money who is the Chief People Officer of Sendgrid (Now a part of Twilio!!), a failed crowd selfie by Denver Mayor Hancock, motivation from Meow Wolf CEO Vince Kadlubek who explained why he wanted Denver to be the first place for Meow Wolf to expand out of Santa Fe, entrepreneurial determination from Daniella Yacobovsky of BaubleBar and… oh yeah, Steve Case who is best known for his part in starting a little company called America Online.

It’s pretty cool that a major name in tech is not the highlight of a keynote. Mitisek pointed out that generosity is part of our brand here in Colorado. Money pointed out that it’s not just if you grow, but how you grow that is important and Kadlubek pointed out that it’s great to ask “What are you willing to live for?” when gauging your pursuits and stressed the importance of creative people and endeavors in the business world. I heard the same pride and concerns with the Colorado technology community that I have from Mitisek, Money and Kadlubek which made me feel pretty darn smart, a little smug, and ok with missing out on breakfast.

After the keynote I headed over to the Commons on Champa where the Chase Bank Basecamp was set up. I was almost instantly overwhelmed so I decided to plug in and do some work on a side project. After a few minutes of pointless clicking on my laptop I realized I wasn’t going to get any work done on my computer so I decided since I was at a great event for networking, I should go network!

I got to meet Chris Martinez who was representing the Veterans in Residence program and I was super excited to finally meet Tamara Chuang after reading her articles from the Denver Post for so long (she’s now a member of the Colorado Sun) but missed out on my chance of talking to Lizelle Van Vuren. Lizelle doesn’t sit still very much so it’s hard to catch up to her once you miss your chance to see her. However I did catch up to Name.com’s Jared Ewy and got to spend some time with him in a big, awkward inflatable blue bowl which sounds like a result from a Mad Lib, but it’s true!

Oh! How much fun would it be to do a Colorado tech/startup MadLib? That sounds like a lot of fun but I’m getting off topic now.

The first panel I went to was at the CA Technologies office which is right above the Lodo Tattered Cover and if I would’ve known that before hand I might have just hidden away there for a while. It was a one man panel by Scott Tolinski on how to learn quickly in a rapidly changing development world. Aside from having an excellent first name, Scott was great at giving expert opinions with humility and gifs. He does a podcast called syntax.fm about web development that I forgot he mentioned until I started writing this post and I look forward to hearing more from him.

The next talk I went to was at Industry in RiNo. This was my first time taking the A line on the Light Rail from Union Station and the amount of changes I saw in that area blew my mind. The last time I was in that area, the idea of “RiNo” was still a new idea. What was seedy industrial buildings known best for being downwind of the Stock Show every year is now fancy apartments, buildings, restaurants, bars, etc. I was floored!

The panel was about the UX design process and as much as I love writing code and learning about the ones and zeros and languages and frameworks I am also fascinated with why people use computers and how they want to use them which is what UX design is all about! The talk was by Ari Weissman of Crownpeak and I really liked his points that if you don’t talk to users, your “UX Design” is just design and that if you ask users what they want, you’ll end up with the Homer Car which no one really wants. It’s better to ask people what they’re trying to do and why they want things then just asking them what features they want. He also mentioned that if you can’t come up with a good idea unless you come up with a lot of ideas which makes me want to jump on the soapbox of practicing which I will not do now.

That wraps up my Day 1. I didn’t go to any of the night time events because my family still likes me and I want to keep it that way. Also, as an introvert, I wasn’t excited to spend more time talking to fun people after spending all day talking to fun people. Next week I’ll post my review of Day 2 which was even more jam packed than Day 1!




Colorado Tech Weekly #277: Solidly Built on Colorado’s Lifestyle and Generous Culture

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I had a great time at Denver Startup Week! It was my first time attending and my list of connections on LinkedIn, my To-Read list on GoodReads and my list of ideas for my career and the startup team I work with have all grown!

There was a definite theme to Denver Startup Week. The Colorado lifestyle (Work is important but so is your health and well-being) and the generous culture of our Colorado tech community make Colorado a great place to work. I heard this listening to Erik Mitisek at the Denver Startup Week kick-off on Monday. I heard this from the panel of engineering leaders from Slack, Gusto, Strava and TradeDesk on Wednesday. I heard this from Manuela Cardenas and Meghan McGinnis, both of whom want to move to Colorado from out of state to start their tech careers. And I experienced it when talking to… (ok I tried to list all the names of the people I talked to who embodied this generosity but the list was to long) …anyone and everyone at Denver Startup Week!

Don’t forget, it’s how we live and treat others that makes our community great! Have a great week!

Top Colorado Technology News

  • When it comes to attracting tech talent in Denver, space matters [DBJ]
  • Boulder’s Sphero and Facebook partner to increase access to computer programming [InnovatioNews]
  • ‘It feels very Slacky’ — Engineers at top tech companies rave about Denver [DBJ]
  • Louisville-based Vaisala reaffirms commitment to Front Range with campus expansion [BizWest]
  • Greystone Gives Back: Volunteering with The Humane Society of Boulder [GreystoneTech]
  • Denver cannabis-tech company MJ Freeway raises $10 million, appoints new CFO [DBJ]
  • A closer look at the hot, fast-growing companies of Denver Startup Week [DBJ]
  • How 3 Colorado tech companies are diversifying their engineering teams [BuiltinColorado]
  • Denver makes Cushman & Wakefield’s 2018 list for top tech cities [DBJ]
  • As company prepares to move its HQ to Denver, HomeAdvisor basks in glow of big year [DenverPost]

Top Upcoming Events

Thank you for reading!

If you know of any other good news stories or sources about tech in Colorado or if you have any news stories or opinions of your own about Colorado tech, email me at COTechWeekly@Gmail.com.

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Colorado Tech Weekly #276: Denver Startup Week is Just a Taste of the Colorado Tech/Startup Community

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This week, most of the focus of the Colorado tech community will be on Denver Startup Week. My focus will also be on Denver Startup Week because I’m super excited to go for the first time. But the really cool thing? It was really easy for me to find at least 10 events to help you connect to the Colorado tech community this week that are NOT a part of Denver Startup Week because this kind of sense of community is not just a once-a-year thing. It happens every day here and that makes me proud to be here.

I finally got my ideal Denver Startup Week itinerary finished this weekend. I’ll be spending some time at the Basecamp Monday and Thursday, but for the most part you can find me in developer panels. This is especially true Tuesday where it looks like I’ll be in developer panels from 8am-6pm!! I think I might need a bigger notebook.

Another reason I didn’t include Denver Startup Week events in this post is because there’s already one easy-to-use place to get info about all of those events at DenverStartupWeek.org.

Have a great week!

Top Colorado Technology News

  • Spire Global to debut its expanded Boulder office, now a key hub [BizWest]
  • Douglas County’s Western Union and Boulder’s Techstars partner on accelerator [BizWest]
  • Denver’s top tech jobs: Survey says Arrow Electronics, HomeAdvisor are the leaders [DenverPost]
  • Google pays Boulder employees $5 a day to leave their cars at home [DenverPost]
  • Boulder startup, Recruiting Innovation, is helping recruiters speak the language of tech [BizWest]
  • Arrow Electronics and Colorado Smart Cities Alliance launch Colorado Open Lab in Centennial [InnovatioNews]
  • Sonu Kansal joins Denver-based NextHealth as Chief Product Officer [NextHealth]
  • Marketo Denver office to keep growing after Adobe acquisition [DBJ]
  • This year, Denver Startup Week is riding a wave of moment in the local tech scene [Denverite]
  • Don’t understand blockchain? Denver Startup Week events will provide deeper understanding of new technology. [DenverPost]

Top Upcoming Events Not at Denver Startup Week

Thank you for reading!

If you know of any other good news stories or sources about tech in Colorado or if you have any news stories or opinions of your own about Colorado tech, email me at COTechWeekly@Gmail.com.

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Colorado Tech Weekly #272: Namaste! Willkommen! Kia Ora! From All Over The World To Colorado

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This week points out a trend that has been going for a while. Tech companies from all over the world are opening and growing offices and Colorado. I think that’s pretty cool!

Have a great week!

Top Colorado Technology News

  • How a Denver blockchain firm, BurstIQ, is making sense of health-care data [DBJ]
  • Spaceport Colorado lands FAA license, moving closer to space tourism flights from Front Range Airport in Adams County [DBJ]
  • Tata Consultancy adding 120 jobs in Denver [BizWest]
  • Denver Startup Week 18: Spotlight on the Developer Track [DenverStartupWeek]
  • Swisslog opens technology center in Broomfield [BizWest]
  • Munich-based eGym plans to grow U.S. HQ in Boulder [BizWest]
  • Talent, financing, IP on minds of Boulder innovators [BizWest]
  • Centennial’s new gigabit internet service ready to light up [DBJ]
  • Software firm Xero to grow Denver headcount to 300 at new U.S. headquarters [DBJ]
  • Boulder-based Zayo Group beats analyst expectations on Q4 revenue [BizWest]

Top Upcoming Events

Thank you for reading!

If you know of any other good news stories or sources about tech in Colorado or if you have any news stories or opinions of your own about Colorado tech, email me at COTechWeekly@Gmail.com.

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Colorado Tech Weekly #226: Overexertion and the Idea of an Amazon HQ2 in Colorado

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Everyone says they want Amazon’s second headquarters to be in Colorado. I admit, it’s a cool idea but I wonder if it’s a good idea. I am wondering a lot of things today, mainly because I overexerted myself last week and I’m super tired, but the question still lingers in my head. What kind of effect would having a large Amazon campus in Colorado have on our tech community? Or a more fun question to consider would be, “What kind of effect would our inclusive tech community have on Amazon?” I think I like considering that question more.

Pro-tip: Don’t renovate a third of your house in 4 days while taking online senior-level college courses and working a more than full-time, high-stress job while managing contract work and a job search. It’s not healthy.

Have a great week!

Top Colorado Technology News

  • California GPS tech company, Trimble, plans big new Westminster building [DBJ]
  • Golden-based HomeAdvisor completes purchase of Angie’s List, goes public, grows 33 percent in a day [DenverPost]
  • Feds clear CenturyLink to buy Broomfield’s Level 3, but with conditions to keep internet competitive [DenverPost]
  • All Colorado Congress members to Jeff Bezos: Build Amazon HQ2 here [DBJ]
  • Colorado Springs-based Rim Technologies Partners with Denver’s SecureSet Academy for cybersecurity Education and hiring [RimTech]
  • Colorado loses a corporate headquarters and a satellite imaging pioneer as Westminster-based DigitalGlobe is purchased [DenverPost]
  • Opportunity awaits: 7 Colorado tech companies hiring top talent now [BuiltinColorado]
  • Colorado Technology Association adds four new members to board [InnovatioNews]
  • Big month for big hires: 6 Colorado tech companies welcome new leaders this September [BuiltinColorado]
  • Denver Startup Week 2017 hit record attendance (again) [DenverPost]

Top Upcoming Events

Thank you for reading!

If you know of any other good news stories or sources about tech in Colorado or if you have any news stories or opinions of your own about Colorado tech, email me at COTechWeekly@Gmail.com.

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Colorado Tech Weekly #225: Python and Blockchains

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I have an Associate’s Degree in Computer Programming from Westwood College, I’m almost done with my Bachelor’s Degree in Computer Science from Regis Univeristy and I have a huge passion for the Colorado tech community and I have never written Python or have any comfort in my knowledge about Blockchains (I understand them as a crowd-sourced linked-list of transactions about a thing. I hope this is right).

This week, there are 2 events about Blockchain and 2 events about Python and it seems like both subjects are coming up more and more so I should probably pay attention to them. I’ll be at the Boulder Python meetup next week. I should probably find a Blockchain meetup to go to soon.

Have a great week!

Top Colorado Technology News

  • Cybersecurity, vacation rentals and more nab “Denver Gazelle” top fast-growing company honors [DenverPost]
  • Denver’s DispatchHealth raises $30.8 million from investors in nod to rise of home doctor visits [DenverPost]
  • Denver HR tech firm, Businessolver, finds benefits, and rapid growth, in metro Denver [DBJ]
  • CenturyLink eyes partnerships for rural broadband and rolls out price-for-life in Colorado [DBJ]
  • Show, don’t tell: 3 Colorado tech companies with benefits that support a balanced life [BuiltinColorado]
  • Job report: Freelance engineers in Denver paid among the least in U.S., but trade lower wage for lifestyle [DenverPost]
  • There are better ways to pitch a story than an embargoed press release [Gadgetress]
  • Boulder-based software company Yonomi raises $1.6 million [BizWest]
  • Boulder’s Sphero shrinks its toy robot in size and price — and the new Mini runs on smiles and winks [DenverPost]
  • Boulder’s Zayo encounters turbulence as execs leave, earnings miss and insiders sell stock [DenverPost]

Top Upcoming Events

Thank you for reading!

If you know of any other good news stories or sources about tech in Colorado or if you have any news stories or opinions of your own about Colorado tech, email me at COTechWeekly@Gmail.com.

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