Dev News Weekly #5: Where it’s mostly about mobile… and niceness

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Dev News Weekly is designed to give you (and me) 10 useful software/web developer stories every Tuesday morning!

I’m not usually one to quote Mother Teresa, but I like this quote a lot. I do have to admit to having ulterior motives with this newsletter though. If I keep this up, I’ll soon learn which technologies I am most interested in. You would think that would be an easy thing for me to figure out, but it’s surprisingly difficult.

Developer News

  • Where are the mobile dev payouts? In enterprise apps [InfoWorld]
  • Sprint partners with Google to sell apps for business [ReCode]
  • Can the Amazon Fire Phone take on iPhone and Samsung? [ReCode]
  • New Firefox 31 focuses on improving developer tools [VentureBeat]
  • Nvidia announces Shield Tablet, an Android device for hardcore gamers [ReCode]
  • Microsoft Open Tech brings support for more open-source projects to Azure [TechCrunch]
  • Cisco launches DevNet to woo software developers [eWeek]
  • Apple has paid $20 billion to iOS devs, half of it in the past year [TechCrunch]
  • For half, degrees In computing, math, Or stats lead to other jobs [Slashdot]
  • Tango luring developers to its platform with new $25 Million Global Games Fund [TechCrunch]

Pick of the Week

I needed to have something else in these posts besides my usual blathering and 10 news stories, so I will choose one thing each week to promote just because I like it.

Ruby Rogues logoThe Ruby Rogues podcast has quickly become one of my favorite programming podcasts! I started listening to it because I am teaching myself Ruby on Rails. This is not why you should listen to this podcast.

It’s a weekly podcast that spends most of the time talking about issues that ALL programmers have, regardless of the language you code in. It’s fun. You should give it a listen.

Thank you for reading!

If you know of any other good news sources for developers (especially newbies like me), please let me know!

You can subscribe to all my posts by email!

Dev News Weekly #4: Where there are 10 stories, no more, no less

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Dev News Weekly is designed to give you (and me) 10 useful software/web developer stories every Tuesday morning!

I have a hard and fast rule for myself when it comes to my Dev News Weekly and Colorado Tech Weekly posts: There will be 10 stories, no more, no less. 10 shall be the number of stories, and the number of stories shall be 10. 11 stories there shall not be, neither should there be 9, excepting that when there is one more to make 10.

This week was especially difficult to narrow all the stories down to 10. No wonder so many people narrow their blogs down to specific languages and frameworks. It’s a little mind-blowing to keep track of it all. I eventually ended up getting frustrated and picking stories that had the word “developer” in the headline. Speaking of frustrating, I realized that I haven’t written any code since I started this news letter. I see little green squares in my near future…and Monty Python.

Developer News

  • We don’t need new image formats: Mozilla works to build a better JPEG [ArsTechnica]
  • Employers use customized bonus plans to attract developers, survey says [ComputerWorld]
  • Apple and IBM want you to use an iPhone at work, please [ArsTechnica]
  • Google offers up a free crash course in Android development [TechCrunch]
  • Net neutrality comments flood FCC, crashing site as deadline extended [ReCode]
  • Microsoft seeks developer partners for mobile-first, cloud-first world [eWeek]
  • Microsoft merges developer resources for Windows Store and Windows Phone, adds 21 new payout markets [TheNextWeb]
  • Developers and Apple open up on new Swift programming language [ZDNet]
  • Amazon sets sights on snagging mobile developers [InfoWorld]
  • Microsoft slashing up to 18,000 jobs [DBJ]

Pick of the Week

I needed to have something else in these posts besides my usual blathering and 10 news stories, so I will choose one thing each week to promote just because I like it.

static.squarespace.comThe Application Developers Alliance is one of the first good, general sources I found for development. It is “a non-profit global membership organization that supports developers as creators, innovators, and entrepreneurs.” It’s geared a little more towards the developer as a business person crowd so if you wonder about ROI as much as you wonder about TDD, then this could be a good group for you.

Thank you for reading!

If you know of any other good news sources for developers (especially newbies like me), please let me know!

You can subscribe to all my posts by email!

Why Every Student Should Go to a Tech Conference

Last week I got to spend the day at the Colorado Technology Association’s APEX Conference in Denver. Going as a student is the best way to visit a technology conference. It was full of professionals eager to share their knowledge and their projects and as a student who isn’t hirable yet, there is no pressure to impress! So what to do I do at a place full of people who do the job and work on the projects that I want to work on? I ask questions of course!

If I wanted to work for your company, what should I learn?

This was my favorite question of the day. Being able to ask straight-forward questions was the best thing about going to the conference. Since I didn’t feel the need to impress people with my knowledge I was able to ask any question that came to mind.

I started my day by grabbing a cup of coffee and sitting at a large table. I ended up sitting next to the CEO of Motocol, Patrick Bailey. Motocol is a Greenwood Villlage-based company that creates enterprise-level mobile software. When I asked Patrick my question I hit a nerve, a good nerve. Patrick is a HTML5 and JavaScript advocate and recommended these languages along with jquery and jquery mobile.

The most popular answer was to learn .NET. This was recommended by representatives with Swiftpage, Slalom and Neudesic. Pivotal Labs educated me about Ruby on Rails. It turns out that Ruby is a language and Rails is a framework. It has nothing to do with red trains. The representative at Ajubeo, a cloud services provider recommended become a DBA and if you want to work for Ping, learn Java.

It’s no longer enough to say “I want to be a developer.” It’s too broad of a statement. I need to figure out what kind of developer I want to be: Web? Enterprise? Mobile? All of the above? None of the above? It’s a fun question to consider.

It’s Nice to Feel Wanted

There seemed to be a theme among the seminars regardless of the subject: A demand for quality developers. No matter which session, whether it was the “Big Data and Analytics”, “Cloud Security” or “The State of the State” the subject of there being not enough developers kept coming up. I wanted to yell out “I’m learning as fast as I can!”

My hope is that other Computer Science students read this and start getting more involved in their tech community before they graduate. It’s a great way to let companies know you’re here working to become the candidate they want. It’s also a great way to find out what you want to learn and what you need to learn to get the job you want.

Good luck and see you at the next tech conference!